All Problems Stem from Interfaces, and That’s Where We Learn

All Problems Stem from Interfaces, and That’s Where We Learn | Socializing Workplace Learning.

In a recent post, Boundaries are for learning, Harold Jarche talks about how learning takes place at the boundaries of human systems. I agree, but interpret Harold’s assertion and thoughts in slightly different terms. In much of my experience, one phrase spoken by a mentor over twenty years ago continues to ring true: “All problems stem from interfaces.”

Social Learning Truths | Socializing Workplace Learning

We hold these truths to be self-evident:

1. That learning is the individual’s right
2. That learning is also the individual’s responsibility, not that of a teacher or organization…

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Learning Socially Taps Into More Knowledge | Socializing Workplace Learning

 

We all operate on a non conscious level in many ways. Maybe some of it is a component of wisdom–applying knowledge intelligently without thinking about it. I certainly think a substantial part of it is knowledge sitting just below our conscious level, waiting to be stimulated back into consciousness. This is partly the fuel of synthesis, where we learn something new and creatively think how we could adapt or integrate it into our situations.

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Social Media, Communication Channels, and Learning | Socializing Workplace Learning

See on Scoop.itWorkplace Learning & Development

Getting to basics, when we refer to a medium we’re talking about a communication channel and not the message content. When I draw in the dirt with a stick, the dirt is the medium, what I scrawl in it is the content, and the gathering around it makes it social. Paint on cave walls, face-to-face gatherings, phone calls, and even email are all media, all communication channels.

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Socializing Instructional Design | Socializing Workplace Learning

See on Scoop.itWorkplace Learning & Development

It’s more important than ever to explore ALL options. It’s easy to get stuck in the weeds or, worse, married to a particular approach–the proverbial hammer in search of nails. That’s why I advocate socializing designs before developing them into products or programs. So many instructional design communities are at our fingertips, waiting to be tapped.

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Adding Social to ADDIE | Socializing Workplace Learning

See on Scoop.itWorkplace Learning & Development

Today’s social media, specifically the very active instructional design networks on LinkedIn (Training Magazine, T+D, ASTD), Yammer (ASTD), and even Twitter (our personal networks), allow us to socialize our designs with others in the community and get feedback in days, if not hours.

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