The learning organization: an often-described, but seldom-observed phenomenon | Harold Jarche

The learning organization: an often-described, but seldom-observed phenomenon | Harold Jarche.

Image: E. Irving Couse; The HistorianSeveral of Harold’s observations on learning in networked environments. Excellent and inspirational view of what a true learning organization should look like.

All Problems Stem from Interfaces, and That’s Where We Learn

All Problems Stem from Interfaces, and That’s Where We Learn | Socializing Workplace Learning.

In a recent post, Boundaries are for learning, Harold Jarche talks about how learning takes place at the boundaries of human systems. I agree, but interpret Harold’s assertion and thoughts in slightly different terms. In much of my experience, one phrase spoken by a mentor over twenty years ago continues to ring true: “All problems stem from interfaces.”

8 Reasons to Focus on Informal & Social Learning

 

“8 Reasons You Should Focus on Informal and Social Learning” by Charles Jennings. Slides from a webinar for the eLearning Network of Australasia – July 2010…

See on www.slideshare.net

Learning Socially Taps Into More Knowledge | Socializing Workplace Learning

 

We all operate on a non conscious level in many ways. Maybe some of it is a component of wisdom–applying knowledge intelligently without thinking about it. I certainly think a substantial part of it is knowledge sitting just below our conscious level, waiting to be stimulated back into consciousness. This is partly the fuel of synthesis, where we learn something new and creatively think how we could adapt or integrate it into our situations.

See on tom.johnandrewrankin.com

A Real Ratio To Pay Attention To: 70:30 | EPPIC – Pursuing Performance

A Real Ratio To Pay Attention To: 70:30 | EPPIC – Pursuing Performance.

Research has concluded: approximately 70% of what an Expert knows – is at the non-conscious level – meaning either “they don’t know what they know” – or – “they do know – what they don’t know – they just cannot tell you anything about it.” They can only tell you about 30 of what they really know to do what a novice would need to know.

Take off those rose coloured glasses | Harold Jarche

See on Scoop.itWorkplace Learning & Development

Joyce Seitzinger referred me to this post, What will your training role be in the future? The author describes four future roles:

1. Design & Create Courses

2.  Enable Learning

3. Support Learning

4. Be a change agent for development

Only the first is related to what L&D has actually been doing. The other three are open for the taking in the networked workplace.

See on www.jarche.com

Social Media, Communication Channels, and Learning | Socializing Workplace Learning

See on Scoop.itWorkplace Learning & Development

Getting to basics, when we refer to a medium we’re talking about a communication channel and not the message content. When I draw in the dirt with a stick, the dirt is the medium, what I scrawl in it is the content, and the gathering around it makes it social. Paint on cave walls, face-to-face gatherings, phone calls, and even email are all media, all communication channels.

See on tom.johnandrewrankin.com

Socializing Instructional Design | Socializing Workplace Learning

See on Scoop.itWorkplace Learning & Development

It’s more important than ever to explore ALL options. It’s easy to get stuck in the weeds or, worse, married to a particular approach–the proverbial hammer in search of nails. That’s why I advocate socializing designs before developing them into products or programs. So many instructional design communities are at our fingertips, waiting to be tapped.

See on tom.johnandrewrankin.com

How to Save ‘Social Learning’ Before We Destroy It | Mindflash

See on Scoop.itWorkplace Learning & Development

Social learning is in many ways the primary way people learn. Social media has in many ways enhanced social learning, but somewhere along the line we allowed social media to define social learning. We need to break the bond between the two and rescue social learning before we dilute and ultimately destroy its value by allowing the phrase to be defined by technology rather than by real, interpersonal social connections and sharing.

See on www.mindflash.com

To learn, we must do | Harold Jarche

See on Scoop.itWorkplace Learning & Development

See on www.jarche.com